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the key individuals involved in the process now, president obama, senator majority leader harry reed and mitch mcconnell. what is the tone? >> it's all about the senate right now, that is one of the more remarkable developments. all along we thought it would be between the obama white house and house speaker john boehner and there was a logic behind that. because getting legislation out of the house is the trickier part of crafting any type of deal. but with the house saying look, we need the senate to do something, the last ditch effort is occurring in the senate right now. i spoke to staffers close to senator mcconnell that said there was optimism on their side yesterday, including from their boss, senator minority leader mitch mcconnell to get a deal. of course, any kind of word in reading from the members themselves will not come until tomorrow, but it's both chris and luke that said in the segment before mine, there is a sense that what might have been optimism yesterday does not exist today. of course, that is what always goes on when you have negotiations. we will see what hap
at some point on the fiscal stuff with obama and expose him or herself to cries of disloyalty on the right and any republican speaker will have to at some point deal with the debt ceiling which will come up in a more or so. is it possible for anybody to really be an effective republican house speaker? >> i don't envy the job but john boehner is a survivor. people forget that he had been on the leadership track rising up through the ranks and got derailed several years ago and he was able to come back. i remember seeing him at a republican event in the 'fwhooirnts in connecticut at a congressional race. he was -- he spent a decade and he may have spent two decades traveling around the country to competitive districts. he has a lot of personal relationships within the caucus even though there's a lot of new members. this is a real leadership test in navigating the fiscal cliff. we saw the debt ceiling debate a year and a half ago. that was a political disaster. a real tough position for john boehner. he had all the freshmen and many of them tea-part backed members that didn't want to comprom
no signs of a deal in the senate right now on how to avert the fiscal cliff. let's bring back the senior editor of "the new republic" and author of "the escape artists, how obama's team fumbled the recovery" and ed o'keefe congressional reporter for the "washington post." thanks to both of you for coming back here. ed, do you think the deal is dead right now? >> no, by no means. as we understand it, negotiations are continuing. right now both parties in the senate are meeting behind closed doors to discuss what was going on and what they may or may not be able to agree to as you've reported throughout the hour. mitch mcconnell has reached out to vice president biden, two experienced legislative hands who have worked together on these types of deals before. if anyone at this late hour could get a deal done it would likely be these two. keep in mind, no matter what deal is crafted on in the senate, voted on tonight and tomorrow morning it still has to get passed here in the house where i'm standing right now. we were talking to tom cole a little while ago on the show. off camera he was tel
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3